Tag Archives: job search

Job Hopping

Indeed, LinkedIn and Glassdoor are probably the top three sites I stroll through the most.  More than Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.  I wake up and religiously look at any new jobs that are currently available in the Greater Nashville Area.  I have no idea why I do this but I do.  Even when I’ve only been at a job for a week.  While in LA, I probably applied to over 100 or so jobs.  I liked both of my jobs, but I think I kept searching and searching because I was in contract roles and I wanted a full-time job with benefits.  In my current role, I also stroll through jobs like crazy.  But now it’s different, I’ve been strolling through jobs because I am ready for the next step in my career.  Currently I am a Talent Acquisition Coordinator and the next step is a Talent Acquisition Specialist, also known as a Recruiter.  I also consistently stroll through these job sites because I want a job that pays more than what I’m getting paid now.

However, doing this looks extremely bad, especially when I haven’t been at said companies for a long time.  I’ve been in my current position now for about 6 months, but a couple of months when I started applying to other jobs, I’d only been in the role for 2-4 months.  A question that often comes up is, “Why are you looking for a new role?” or my application would get rejected before a recruiter would call me because I’ve only been in my current role for a short period of time, obvisouly they’re thinking, well if she’s only been in that role for 2 months and is looking for something new, she’s going to do the same thing once she starts working here.

Right after I accepted my position with my current company, a recruiter had reached out to me on LinkedIn about how there’s an opportunity that she’d like to talk to me about in my area, etc., etc., etc., but I told her that I had just accepted a new position.  Well fast forward to four months later and I’d reached back out to her on LinkedIn and asked her if we could just have a phone conversation about my my career aspirations, necessary steps I needed to take to get there and just overall advice.  We scheduled a phone conversation and she basically told me to stick it out with my company for at least a year.  Don’t put in job applications in other place and to only consider leaving my current company if an other company reached out to me for a full-time role in exactly what I want to do in life.  In a year, hopefully a role in what I want to do in my career field will open at my current company and if not, at least I have that longevity on my resume for my current company.  She told me keywords to look for when that time does come around to search.  It was a really good conversation.  I told her my issues and she just really had good advice overall.

So below, I have listed a couple of cons to think about if you’re a job hopper:

Think about what it’ll look to recruiters/hiring manager.  If you are at companies for a short period of time and are at your current company for a short period of time and are looking for a new job, it raises a flag to those people.  I remember I applied for a job once and the recruiter reached out to me with an e-mail asking, why I had been in my roles for only a short period of time.  I thought I had good answers for each, but obviously they weren’t good enough because she never reached back out to me.  The recruiter I reached out to on LinkedIn also made a valid point.  Two of my jobs were contract roles and although I have that stated on my resume and that would be an obvious reason as to why I stayed at my jobs for a short period of time, to a recruiter or hiring manager, it would then raise the question, “Well why do you keep only applying to contract positions?”

Seeking opportunities/advancement within your company.  Sometimes it’s not about the company, but rather your job title and duties that you have an issue with.  For me, I am bored of being in the Coordinator role.  I’ve done this for the last year and I think it’s time for me to move up.  However, as opposed to looking outside my company, I should be looking for opportunities within the company when that time comes.  It’ll look better and the chances are higher for you getting the job when you’re an internal candidate.  A lot of companies also welcome getting experience in different departments if that’s something that you desire.

It can hurt you financially.  A lot of times, hopping from job to job can hurt you financially.  You get your last paycheck from your most recent job, but than you may end up waiting up to three weeks before you can see a paycheck because of when you came in and started your first day.  If you don’t already have money saved up, you can be put into a financial burden.

Basically, I said all of this to say, if you’re in a position and you don’t like, try to stick it out for at least 6 months or if your resume is choppy, for a year.

Tell Me About Yourself?

“So, tell me about yourself?” What seems like an easy and simple question could possibly be the hardest question, especially in an interview.  What do I say? Do I literally tell them about myself? I mean surely they want to know what kind of car I drive and that I’ve been natural for 4 years now, right?

I read an article on The Muse and I really liked the formula that they used when answering that question.  “Present-Past-Future formula.” Basically, you start off with where you are now, where you once were, and were you eventually want to be.  Let’s say I was interviewing for a position as an Assistant Buyer:

“Well, I’m currently an Admissions Representative at Hockaday School, where I basically recruit and enroll students to come to our school.  Before that I pretty much worked in retail and that’s the path I’m trying to get back on considering I got my bachelor’s degree in Fashion Merchandising, however I’m looking for something higher up than just a sales associate using my basic math fundamental and merchandising skills.”

Basically, in my answer, I told them what I am currently doing, what I previously did that’s related to the job industry I’m interviewing for, I threw in my degree that’s also related, and a couple of skills that I possess that’ll help me in this job.

When answering this question, it’s basically a selling opportunity.  You’re trying to sell yourself to the interviewer and why they should hire you.  Thinking back to when I used to go on interviews, I used to answer the question like so:

“Well, obviously my name is Jasmine, I’m from Memphis, TN, I go to school for fashion merchandising, and yeah that’s about it.”

Although saying that has got me quite a bit of jobs, I wasn’t really “selling” myself to the interviewer.  I was literally giving them an about me that was in my twitter bio.

xoxo

-Jas ❤

Image source: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/sotell-me-yourself-kristin-sherry